The Scent-Control Technology Our Competitors Wish They Had

Odor Adsorption Capacity

FINDINGS

The odor-adsorption capacity test (shown at right) showed that Scent-Lok Carbon Alloy single-layer BaseSlayers adsorbed 252.5 μg/cm2 of odor. The same test showed that the ScentBlocker jacket’s fabric adsorbed just 24.6 μg/cm2 of odor, the ScentBlocker shirt’s fabric adsorbed only 14.9 μg/cm2 of odor and the Under Armour Scent Control shirt’s fabric adsorbed a meager 10.5 μm/cm2 of odor.

What this ultimately means is that Scent-Lok Carbon Alloy fabrics outperformed ScentBlocker and Under Armour fabrics by a wide margin. In fact, these “competitive” garments performed no better than non-technical fabrics at controlling odor.

Odor adsorption capacity of hunting garment fabrics in micrograms per square centimeter (μg/cm2) using 13-component odor test mixture. Data calculated from 1 hour incubation measurements at 37°C.

Butyric Acid Odor Adsorption Capacity

APPLES TO APPLES

To go even further, these results were recalculated using the same scale that some competitors use for reporting results. This method takes into account the weight of the material rather than surface area. In addition these tests isolated butyric acid as the representative human odor.

The recalculated odor-adsorption capacity test showed that Scent-Lok Carbon Alloy single-layer BaseSlayers adsorbed 1274.40 μg/gram of odor. The same test showed that the ScentBlocker jacket’s fabric adsorbed just 98.62 μg/gram of odor, the ScentBlocker shirt adsorbed only 82.21 μg/gram of odor and the Under Armour Scent Control shirt’s fabric adsorbed just 56.77 μm/gram of odor.

Butyric acid adsorption capacity of hunting garment fabrics in micrograms per gram (μg/gram) using 13-component odor test mixture. Data calculated from 1 hour incubation measurements at 37°C.

ACTUAL GARMENTS TESTED

The Rutgers independent study tested actual garments that consumers can purchase at many retailers. These garments were tested in pristine condition before any washing occured. By testing commercial garments, these tests can show the true efficacy consumers can expect in the field. Testing that uses fabrics challenged against raw products can yield misleading information for consumers.